breast cancer awareness quiz
1 in 8 women
will be diagnosed with
breast cancer
in their lifetime in the UK.
Please provide your name and age so
we can tailor the quiz to you.
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Did you know?
In the UK, women aged 50-70 are invited to attend a screening appointment every 3 years. While not every woman will have received their invitation as soon as they are 50, you should receive your first invitation before your 53rd birthday.

In England, an extension of the age range of women eligible for breast screening is being phased in for those aged 47-50 and 70-73. This started in 2010 and is expected to be complete by 2016.

Once you reach the age of 70, you won't be invited for an appointment unless you're part of the pilot extension for the screening programme, but you can ask for an appointment every 3 years.

Did you know?
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 50,000 women diagnosed every year.

Risk increases with age so older women are at the greatest risk of the disease.

While age is a big risk factor, women of all ages get breast cancer so being breast aware throughout your life is really important.

How often
            do you check
                                       your breasts ?
At least once a month
It's great that you're checking your breasts regularly
Research has shown that women who saw their doctor within 3 months of first noticing a breast cancer symptom were more likely to be alive after 5 years than those who delayed seeing their doctor by 3-6 months.

Although there is no official guidance about how often you should check your breasts for the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, it's important that you get into the routine of checking your breasts so that you notice any changes as quickly as possible.

Between once a month and once a year
It's good that you're checking your breasts and it's important to get into a regular routine
Research has shown that women who saw their doctor within 3 months of first noticing a breast cancer symptom were more likely to be alive after 5 years than those who delayed seeing their doctor by 3-6 months.

Although there is no official guidance about how often you should check your breasts for the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, it's important that you get into the routine of checking your breasts so that you notice any changes as quickly as possible.

Never
It's really important to check your breasts regularly
Research has shown that women who saw their doctor within 3 months of first noticing a breast cancer symptom were more likely to be alive after 5 years than those who delayed seeing their doctor by 3-6 months.

Although there is no official guidance about how often you should check your breasts for the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, it's important that you get into the routine of checking your breasts so that you notice any changes as quickly as possible.

Are you confident
                      that you know how to
                                       check your breasts?
Confident
It's great that you're checking your breasts regularly
Unfortunately though, not all women feel as confident. In a recent survey, we found that 36% of women were not confident about how to check their breasts and the surrounding area.
It's really important to become familiar with how your breasts look and feel so that you are able to spot any abnormal changes as soon as possible.
Not Confident
You're not alone.
In a recent survey we found that 36% of women were not confident about how to check their breasts and the surrounding area.

The most important thing you can do is to become familiar with how your breasts look and feel so that you are able to spot any abnormal changes as soon as possible.

Do you know
           the signs
and
                   symptoms

                                               of breast cancer?
Yes
It's great that you can identify some of the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, as this will help you to find any signs early.

Many people know that a lump in your breast or surrounding area can be a sign of breast cancer but there are a number of other symptoms to look out for too.

No
It's important to know the signs and symptoms of breast cancer, as this will help you to find any signs early.

Many people know that a lump in your breast or surrounding area can be a sign of breast cancer but there are a number of other symptoms to look out for too.

Check the signs and symptoms
of breast cancer here
Which 4 of these are established risk factors for breast cancer?
Established, possible and doubtful breast cancer risk factors.
Not all risk factors are stated here. For more information, please visit www.breastcancercampaign.org
Established: Age
The risk of breast cancer increases with age. Most cases are diagnosed in women over 50 but women of all ages get breast cancer.
Doubtful: Breast injury
This is considered an unlikely factor in influencing risk.
Possible: Stress
Research into a link between stress and breast cancer has so far been inconclusive.
Established: Alcohol intake
Alcohol increases the risk of breast cancer. In the UK, around 6 in every 100 cases could be due to alcohol consumption.
Possible: Nightshift work
More research is needed before we fully understand the link between nightshift work and breast cancer.
Established: Being inactive
Being physically inactive can increase a woman's risk of developing breast cancer.
Doubtful: Underwired bras
There's no evidence that underwired bras increase your risk of breast cancer.
Established: Family history
Of all women who develop breast cancer, up to 1 in 5 have a significant family history of the disease.
Doubtful: Deodorants
There is no convincing evidence that deodorants or antiperspirants increase breast cancer risk.
Established = there's considerable evidence

Possible = evidence is not completely clear

Doubtful = unlikely to affect your risk
Toral Shah,
diagnosed at age 29

"I checked my breasts and found a lump which made me go to the doctor. It was because I checked, that my breast cancer was detected early. We know that early detection increases your chances of survival so if you find anything unusual go and see your GP."
Geraldine Lowe,
diagnosed at age 57

"Having had breast cancer myself and following the tragic death of my twin sister to the disease, I cannot stress enough how important it is for women to know their screening entitlement and to make sure they check their breasts regularly for the signs and symptoms of breast cancer. If you do find anything unusual, you should let your doctor know straight away, as early diagnosis can help increase your chance of survival."
Share
73% of women never, or rarely, discuss breast checking with their family and friends.

Yet knowing the signs and symptoms of breast cancer and how to check your breasts is very important for the early detection and survival of the disease.

That's why we need you to share this quiz with those you love.